Celebrating the past, looking to the future - Special commemorative issue

Issue 5967

Standing upon giants' shoulders - paying tribute to the lineage of BB Editors

BB looks forward to British Open and Lower Section finals

The brass band repertoire - use it or lose it?

 

 

Yorkshire Regional Championships - Championship Section LIVE!

Sunday 4 March, 2018

Championship Section

Test-piece: Odyssey (Kevin Norbury)

Sunday 4 March

Draw: 1.15pm (commences 3.15pm)

Adjudicators: Robert Childs and Arsène Duc

Kenny Crookston reporting

 

Results:

1. Black Dyke (Professor Nicholas Childs)

2. Brighouse and Rastrick (Professor David King)

3. Grimethorpe Colliery (Allan Withington)

4. Carlton Main Frickley Colliery (Ian Porthouse)

5. Rothwell Temperance (David Roberts)

6. Hepworth (Leigh Baker)

7. Hammonds Saltaire (Morgan Griffiths)

8. Elland Silver (Daniel Brooks)

9. City of Bradford (Lee Skipsey)

10. Yorkshire Imperial Urquhart Travel (Russell Gray)

11. Unite the Union (John Roberts)

12. Marsden Silver (Mark Peacock)

13. Hatfield (Stan Lippeatt)

Youngest Player: Lewis Barton, 12, Elland Silver

Best Soloist: Kirsty Abbotts, cornet, Carlton Main

Best Principal Cornet: Richard Marshall (Black Dyke)

Best Instrumentalist: Shaun Crowther, Eb bass, Grimethorpe Colliery

 

In the BB Frame

1. Carlton Main Frickley Colliery (Ian Porthouse)

2. Black Dyke (Professor Nicholas Childs)

3. Brighouse and Rastrick (Professor David King)

4. Grimethorpe Colliery (Allan Withington)

5. City of Bradford (Lee Skipsey)

6. Hammonds Saltaire (Morgan Griffiths)

 

19:30 - Another terrific night at the Yorkshire Area and we've heard quite a number of excellent performances. There will be divided opinion at the top, but for us Carlton Main's consistency in delivery and occasional brilliance has won the day. Black Dyke should have done enough to join Frickley at the Finals while B&R's sheer quality, despite prominent slips, could keep it towards the top end. Real results coming soon.

 

13. Unite the Union (John Roberts)

Final band and not the least effective opening we’ve heard and we enjoy the cornet sound and security at Meno Mosso. Other intricate solo links are all well delivered too. Allegro Vivace has a few weaker sections where the accuracy really drops. Good to hear the louder dynamics being kept within safety limits too - some earlier bands would have done well to have taken the same path. Good works from cornet and euphonium soloists and we liked the back row cornet accompaniments. Presto has a lot to commended in terms of accuracy; just missing that extra layer of dynamic contrast to take it up a level. We’ve enjoyed this performance a lot though, despite the tired ending. Not far from the top six for us.

 

12. Elland Silver (Daniel Brooks)

Big opening from percussion and the band sound is hard in comparison to some we’ve heard. Meno Mosso works pretty well and the horns are a match for any. Allegro Vivace doesn’t really come off overall. The tempo feels right for the music, but too many entries really struggle speak clearly amid the volume. Terrific cornet solo and the euphonium is a perfect match in a very good slow section - bravo back row cornets! Presto tempo is well suited to the band’s technique and the piece finishes in excellent shape. A good show overall with some fine soloists. 

 

11. Grimethorpe Colliery (Allan Withington)

Big, bold and expansive in the opening. Every line is heard clearly, as are the occasionally split or two. Cornets right on the money at meno mosso and there’s a real feeling of relaxation in the music-making. Allegro Vivace shifts along. Everything is going with real commitment but the quality isn’t always 100% in delivery. Solo work is all good in the adagio, although there is occasional discomfort. Presto rocks along in style. It becomes extremely loud to the point where it is difficult to decipher some of the lines towards the end. Possibly one that got away for Grimey. Could be close though.

 

10. Hammonds Saltaire (Morgan Griffiths)

Some untidiness in the opening but it soon recovers and stays in good shape to Allegro Vivace, which knocks along with dynamic energy. Not all the solo lines come through clearly and there are a few blips and blobs in the middle of the band. Good intricate work, especially from the cornets, keeps the levels high and it approaches the middle section with full commitment. Solo work is all good here, but the musical shapes are where the real quality is. An excellent section. Presto isn’t quite as tidy, especially at the lower end, but this has been a good performance overall.

 

9. Carlton Main Frickley Colliery (Ian Porthouse)

Another terrific opening - real bold sounds without losing the tone like many have. Excellent all the way to Meno Mosso, where the whole front row delivers in spades. Everything heard clearly as it approaches Allegro Vivace, which also has quality and energy in abundance. Terrific interplay around the band - horns and upper cornets are particularly good. Cornet produces the moment of the weekend - spine-tingling. Great work in the muted decoration - especially back row cornets. Presto has drive and precision. What a performance from Frickley!

 

8. Brighouse and Rastrick (Professor David King)

Heavily accented opening but the quality is clear immediately and the band has the full spectrum of sound when it opens up. Cornets handle the meno mosso beautifully and the transparency in the following section is striking, as are the changes of style. The odd split seems insignificant when measured against playing of this quality. Cornet solo has real beauty but the closing bars are less successful. Other solo work that follows is all delivered with style. Presto isn’t the quickest we’ve heard, but it is the cleanest. The final section is as vibrant as it gets. A brilliant performance overall, but the small number of flaws may just have been too prominent.

 

7. Rothwell Temperance (David Roberts)

Opening is clean and robust without becoming over-aggressive. Cornets feel thin in sound at Meno Mosso. There is excellent clarity about all of this, however. Allegro Vivace is less clean and the energy levels seem to drop on the journey. The frenzied activity returns, although interspersed with moments of high quality section and ensemble playing. Another good cornet solo, although trombone and euphonium find contrasting styles that don’t really match for us. Presto - loads of good ensemble playing here and the overall impression remains committed all the way. Certainly one to watch tonight!

 

6. Hepworth (Leigh Baker)

A heavy approach to the opening, but only very briefly before it becomes expansive and transparent. Cornets knock over one or two at Meno Mosso. The heavy boots are on again at Allegro Vivace and there’s quite a frenzied feeling to it all, even if it does all seem to be going in pretty accurately. Nicely done cornet and euphonium; some of the decoration is quite comfortable dynamically. Presto has the band on its technical limits, but it stays cohesive and we like the broad approach to the finale. Just a tad aggressive at times but otherwise a good show.

 

5. Black Dyke (Professor Nicholas Childs)

A greater level of rhythmic clarity than we’ve hear thus far and the style is suitable delicate at times. Cornets pristine at Meno Mosso and all following solo links are well placed. Allegro Vivace is textbook and we love the transparency of the gigue. Cornet solo sits perfectly amid the air of absolute quality being created and the euphonium solo is simply majestic. Presto races along and is still crystal clear, but with accented detail in abundance. Finale is triumphant. Could be hard to beat.

 

4. Yorkshire Imperial Urquhart Travel (Russell Gray)

As well-measured an opening as we’ve heard and it never threatens to get too aggressive. Great work by the cornets at Meno Mosso. Just the odd blip follows, but we really like the style of this one. Allegro Vivace all feels under control. There are times that brass and percussion seem to become disjointed, while the level of detail heard becomes less as it moves on. It keeps its more jocular style, however. Nice work on the cornet solo - the join is seamless! Quite comfortable dynamically in the slow section in general. Presto is really shifting along - they can play it though, so the tempo works. The finale fades slightly but it has been an excellent performance - best we’ve heard Yorkshire Imps in quite a few years!

 

3. Hatfield (Stan Lippeatt)

Opens well but there are few disjointed moments around bars 14-17. Another that gets a bit aggressive at times. Cornets cut it down at Meno Mosso and it works well. Better clarity at Allegro Vivace, but it feels like the energy levels drop as it progresses. We like the style of the Giojoso and the cornet solo is almost perfect. Euphonium is very dominant in his solo. Presto returns to the committed style and we’re not sure that it needs to be quite so heavy-handed. Overall this was a good performance but one that might struggle to survive near the top as the evening progresses.

 

2. Marsden Silver (Mark Peacock)

Nicely graded dynamics in the opening and we can hear most of the lines clearly. Just the occasional drop in precision in the cornets especially. Cornets have a nightmare entry at the Meno Mosso and the dominoes start to tumble for a bit. Some poor tuning follows but sanity is restored at Allegro Vivace. It is rather aggressive in style though, and the intricate work is less than accurate. Bravo solo cornet and euphonium. The muted cornet tuning isn’t spot on, however. Presto knocks along well and all the melodic interjections are well placed. Perhaps a bit tired towards the end but this has been a good show overall, despite some rather nasty slips.

 

1. City of Bradford (Lee Skipsey)

Excellent open section with only minor splits near the top end. All the intricate solo entries are well handled as it evolves. Allegro Vivace has boundless energy - swashbuckling even! Some of the detail does get swamped at times and the tuning at the top isn’t complete precise. Love cornet style in the solo and the top C seems effortless. Lovely playing all round in the tranquil section - beautifully measured. Presto is off like lightning and it feels too fast for some. It maintains its flow brilliantly, however, and the end is as powerful as we would expect from a band that plays with such commitment. Excellent!

 

Draw

1. City of Bradford (Lee Skipsey)

2. Marsden Silver (Mark Peacock)

3. Hatfield (Stan Lippeatt)

4. Yorkshire Imperial Urquhart Travel (Russell Gray)

5. Black Dyke (Professor Nicholas Childs)

6. Hepworth (Leigh Baker)

7. Rothwell Temperance (David Roberts)

8. Brighouse and Rastrick (Professor David King)

9. Carlton Main Frickley Colliery (Ian Porthouse)

10. Hammonds Saltaire (Morgan Griffiths)

11. Grimethorpe Colliery (Allan Withington)

12. Elland Silver (Daniel Brooks)

13. Unite the Union (John Roberts)