Viking invasion complete!

Issue 5960

Eikanger's North Sea odyssey seals historic Sage success

2017's recording highlights celebrated

2018 European line-up taking shape

Brass in Concert - LIVE!

Sunday 19 November, 2017

Adjudicators

Quality of Performance: Lito Fontana and Jan Van Der Roost

Programme Content: Nick Grace

Entertainment and Presentation: Richard Evans and Peter Francomb

Soloists and Individual Awards: Ian Bousfield

 

Anne Crookston reporting

 

 

FINAL RESULTS: 

Winning Band: Eikanger-Bjørsvik Musikklag

2nd overall: Fountain City

3rd overall: Foden's

4th overall: Cory

5th overall:  Tredegar

6th overall:  Paris Brass Band

Quality of Performance: Eikanger-Bjørsvik Musikklag

Programme Content: Fountain City

Best Performance in Entertainment and Presentation: Fountain City

Audience Entertainment Trophy: Tredegar 

Best New Composition by Fabien Cali - Life Paris Brass Band

Best Soloist: Gary Curtin: Foden's

Best Soprano: Ryan Sharp: Fountain City Brass

Best Principal Cornet: Kirsty Abbotts: Carlton Main Frickley Colliery

Best Flugel: Helen Williams: Cory

Best Tenor Horn: Sheona White: Brighouse and Rastrick

Best Baritone: Tredegar

Best Euphonium: Glyn Williams: Cory

Best Trombone: Bass trombone, Eikanger-Bjørsvik Musikklag

Best Bass Section: Cory 

Best percussion: Fountain City Brass Band

Youngest Player: Alex Evans: Tredegar

In the BB Frame

1. Cory (Philip Harper)

2. Paris Brass Band (Florent Didier)

3. Tredegar (Ian Porthouse)

4. Foden’s (Dr. Robert Childs)

5. Eikanger-Bjørsvik Musikklag (Reid Gilje) 

6. Fountain City (Dr. Joseph Parisi)

7. Brighouse and Rastrick (Dr. David Thornton)

8. Flowers (David Childs)

9. Leyland (Thomas Wyss)

10. Grimethorpe Colliery (Capt. Sam Hairsine) 

11. Virtuosi GUS (Adam Cooke)

12. Carlton Main Frickley Colliery (Ian McElligott) 

N.B. Not the official result!

 

 

12. Tredegar (Ian Porthouse)

 

Breaking Boundaries: A celebration of the spirit of adventure 

A nation responds... Calling All Workers (Eric Coates arr. Ceri John) 

Going all the way back to 1940 and the inception on the BBC’s ‘Calling All Workers’. The band is in three-part formation – cornets, horns and flugel standing around the outside with euphoniums, trombones and basses seated in the centre. This is a stylish and polished opener – it promises great things!

Seeking freedom through music... A Mis Abuelos (Arturo Sandoval arr. Jacob Vilhelm Larsen - trumpet soloist: Dewi Griffiths) 

The legend that is Dewi Griffiths plays music written by the legend that is Arturo Sandoval. Switching between his mellow flugel and thrilling trumpet, Dewi brings fiery Latin heat to the proceedings.

Fighting for a cause... Ivory Ghosts (Gavin Higgins) 

Inspired by his earlier groundbreaking work Dark Arteries, Gavin Higgins was inspired to write this lament to the illegal trade in ivory and featuring from Ballet Rambert Hayley Walker and Scott Knight. This is a mesmerising and soulful work – beautifully crafted and a delight for the eyes and ears.

Reinventing tradition... Fuga y Misterio (Astor Piazzolla arr. Leigh Baker) 

Re-inventing traditional Argentinian folk music Tredegar continue with the music of Astor Piazolla. Another superbly crafted work this time from the pen of Leigh Baker, this features a number of the band’s soloists beginning with the band’s principal baritone accompanied by vibraphone.

The forgotten innovator... Gypsy Dance (Alexander Dargomyzhsky arr. Ceri John) 

A thrilling tour-de-force for this little known composer and band alike – what a breath-taking number.

Celebrating acceptance and inclusion... Rainbow Connections (Daniel Hall)

Stemming from the band’s appearance in the film Pride and London Pride march of 2015 this is a fitting conclusion to the band’s ‘Breaking Boundaries’ programme. Based on ‘Somewhere Over the Rainbow”  and in the style of ‘Nightingale Dances’ a previous winner of the prize for Best new Composition at this contest. The band’s fantastic solo trombone is featured before Hayley Walker makes a return, emerging from the cornet section to insert a short soft-shoe shuffle. A thrilling programme – full of interest and variety, performed superbly. This has been a real pleasure.

 

11. Foden’s (Dr. Robert Childs)

Six-times winner of Brass in Concert, Foden’s programme is a celebration of youth – something to which the band is hugely committed.

Youngblood (Daniel Hall) 

This opens with cornets situated around the band accompanied by driving percussion. Horns, flugel and baritones take their place across the front of the stage before being replaced by the awesome trombone section. Finally Dr. Robert Childs takes the stage and this energetic opener builds to a close.

Elfried (George Swift arr. Alan Catherall - euphonium soloist: Gary Curtin) 

George Swift wrote this for himself a was a originally a dedication to his German-born wife Elfriede, today played beautifully by the band’s principal euphonium, Gary Curtin. He also provides the laugh-out-loud comedy moments with his vocals and spectacular euphonic gymnastics! Fantastic.

12th Street Rag (Eubay Bowman arr. Daniel Hall) 

Especially written for today – I suspect high jinks!! Ostensibly a cornet feature, but John Barber tries to steal the show.  We finally have some slapstick involving dustbin lids and John Barber losing his slide! Good fun.

Memories of a Lost Child (Ben Hollings) 

Peter Pan, leader of Never-Never land’s lost boys is the inspiration for Ben Hollings’ original composition. In darkness and with the atmosphere built upon a tuned percussion opening, the vocals and the on-screen animation is beautifully effective.

Diversions after Purcell (Purcell arr. Jonathan Bates) 

Fugue from Young Persons Guide to the Orchestra (Benjamin Britten arr. David Childs)

These two pieces stay with the theme of youth and interlock, concluding with David Childs’ tour-de-force transcription of the Britten’s great work.

Bates’ Diversions takes us around the band in virtuosic style and merges seamlessly with the fugue. The playing is superb and so controlled. Fresh, vibrant and at times thrilling playing – this is a definite contender – so enjoyable.

 

10. Leyland (Thomas Wyss)

‘ A Tribute to Stanley Black’

What Now My Love (Stanley Black arr. John Doyle) 

A take on Bolero in 4/4 ro open … another interesting arrangement by john Doyle – it lets the band get on stage, and once again we are lined up across the front. The style is lovely though and interestingly choreographed. Gradually building to a superb close and a Mexican wave of a bow. The theme – dedicated to Stanley Black gives Frank plenty of material to work with, even poking a little fun (again) at the band’s former conductor and today’s entertainment adjudicator, Richard Evans.

Malaguena (Stanley Black arr. Thomas Wyss) 

Featuring the band’s principal euphonium player and principal cornet player Ian Culross on guitar (who knew? It’s balanced nicely and we hear the thrilling sound of the band in places but balanced beautifully against the atmospheric sound of the acoustic guitar. Café sounds and a background of flamenco dancing begin the gradual accelerando. This works beautifully.

People (Jule Stryne arr. Stanley Black trans. Alan Catherall - trumpet soloist: John Doyle) 

This is an arrangement that works so well, and with john Doyle on lead trumpet the style is just right as well – so enjoyable.

Meadowland (Stanley Black arr. John Doyle)

Leyland close their programme with an arrangement by John Doyle based on The Song of The Plains, a Russian folk song that hasn’t been heard since its original recording in the 1960s. Atmospheric (and nicely executed) choral work gradually build to a close. Not perhaps the showstopper promised in the opening works in this programme, but warmly applauded by the audience.

 

9. Grimethorpe Colliery (Capt. Sam Hairsine) 

 

Lawrence of Arabia (Maurice Jarre arr. Mortimer) 

‘Born of Revolution’ is the chosen theme for the most successful band in Brass in Concert history. Celebrating their centenary this year, Grimethorpe’s conductor Capt. Sam Hairsine contrasts the revolutionary events going on across the world to the beginnings of this great band. Opening with Maurice Jarre’s iconic score for the 1092 epic feature film. Linking the works in the programme to the history of the band itself. A slightly awkward ending with a ringing tam-tam!

Toccata from Le Tombeau de Couperin (Ravel arr. Tony Rickard) 

Dedicated to friends of Ravel who had been killed in the Great War, particularly the Battle of Passchendaele, this commission of a previously never-before arranged movement from Le Tombeau de Couperin is a showstopper. Grimethorpe are in sparkling form here.

In Christ Alone (Getty and Townsend arr. R. Philips) 

The development of young players is the inspiration for the band’s next piece and aptly done so by featuring their young Scottish solo euphonium player Chris Robinson truly ends on a high note and absolutely brings the house down.

Little Fugue in G Minor (J.S. Bach arr. Sandy Smith) 

This is vintage Grimethorpe, it fits their theme and the legendary Sandy Smith should rightly feature in this programme abut it’s getting slower and the band look a bit disengaged. Still, there are moments of delicacy and the end is huge.

Prelude to Lavenham (Geoffrey Nobes) 

The band can now do what brass bands do best – play a hymn tune. In this case the Prelude to Lavenham, a staple work featured by the International Staff Band of the Salvation Army in their recent concerts. Grimethorpe’s solo trombonist features in this lovely work.

Celestial Celebration - Finale from Earthrise (Nigel Clarke)

Nigel Clarke is the band’s international Composer-in-Association and has written this to commemorate the band’s centenary year and what a blockbuster it is.

Great band playing from Grimethorpe, and we get the theme of the programme, however it perhaps lacks the wow-factor today.

8. Brighouse and Rastrick  (Dr. David Thornton)

‘…point me to the skies’ - a celebration of the human spirit 

Declaration (Drew Fennell) 

‘…all men are created equal, they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable rights, that among these are life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness.’ - The Declaration of Independence (1776) 

The cornets are situated around the band and their fanfare opening leads to a solidly delivered euphonium statement. Love the sound of this band as the piece develops – trombones are facing us and in declamatory style they are magnificent. Brighouse open their programme in plant-your-feet solid style.

Ave Maria (J.S. Bach/Gounod arr. Andrew Baker - horn soloist: Sheona White) 

’The final aim of all music should be none other than the glory of God and the refreshment of the soul.’ - J.S. Bach (1716) 

With only vibraphone and the occasional echo from soprano and cornet, Sheona’s Ave Maria  was perhaps the most emotionally sublime performance of the day. Frank calls this absolutely to a tee – “music from the Heavens”.

Metal (Graham Fitkin arr. Andrew Baker) 

“Doctors and scientists said that breaking the four-minute mile was impossible, that one would die in the attempt. Thus, when I got up after collapsing at the finish line, I figured I was dead.” - Roger Bannister (1954) 

In this specially commissioned arrangement by Andrew Baker the spirit and energy of Roger Banister’s 4-minute-mile is captured perfectly.

Reaching for the Stars (Michael Kamen arr. Andrew Baker) 

‘Here men from the Planet Earth first set foot upon the moon, July 1969 A.D. We came in peace for all mankind.’ - The inscription on a plaque left behind after Apollo 11 departed. 

Taken from Mchael Kamen’s orchestral work for the new millenium this arrangement is a tribute to the indomitable nature of  human spirit and features the band’s principal cornet player Kathleen Gaspoz – what a beautiful sound.

Finale from Vita Destructa (Todd Smith) 

“For time and the world do not stand still. Change is the law of life. And those who look only to the past or present are certain to miss the future.” John F. Kennedy (1963)

Using the hymn tune Abide With Me, New Zealand composer Todd Smith pays tribute to those caught up in the natural disaster that struck Christchurch in 2011. Cornets are again situated around the outside of the band. Fracturing, rending sounds give way to a delicate lament before building once more to a final joyful intoning of the full hymn tune.

Brighouse – under the guiding hand of David Thornton are in splendid form. Sheona White provides the solo of the day for me and is very warmly received by the audience. Will it feature as highly with the adjudicators?

 

 

7. Cory (Philip Harper)

Sergeant Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band - The World’s Most Iconic Album Sleeve EVER! 

It was 50 years ago today… 

Sergeant Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band (Paul McCartney arr. Philip Harper), I’ll Get By With a Little Help From My Friends (McCartney arr. Harper - featuring Tom Hutchinson and Stephanie Wilkins (cornets), Chris Thomas and Gareth Robinson (trombones)

Sergeant Pepper – delivered with the best (and cheesiest) band singing we’ve ever heard here at the Sage – it delivers on every level!

Yes – this is the one. It has everything – the band are in their white dinner jackets, Philip is in a psychedelic shirt – the four soloists are in various ‘Fab Four’ coloured jackets. Visually it looks fantastic – aurally, it’s fantastic and he has the audience in the palm of his hand again.

Their final bows mirror the album cover perfectly – WOW!

The Great Entertainers 

Captain from Castile (Alfred Newman arr. Philip Harper) 

This nod to Tyrone Power whose black and white image appears on the album cover has all the swashbuckling fire and fury of the original film – and is another crowd-pleaser.

The Visionary Artists 

Mood Indigo (Duke Ellington, arr. Philip Harper) 

We continue on the theme of icons that appear on the album cover – this time Richard Merkin, an artist who provides the inspiration for Cory’s soloist. A slight re-arrangement of the band to allow their BBb tuba Tim Evans to sit in Tom Hutchinson’s seat while he delivers the most sublime muted cornet rendition of Mood Indigo. So stylish.

The Noble Poets 

And Death Shall Have No Dominion (Philip Harper - euphonium soloist: Glyn Williams) 

This time the connection with Welsh poet Dylan Thomas – who appears on the left side of the album cover. It references the assassination of John Lennon, opening with the five gunshots that killed him. Soloist Glynn Williams excels, while the (Richard Burton?) narrated words of Dylan Thomas make an effective backdrop. The warmth of new hope is noted in the final bars by a quotation form Lennon’s Imagine.

The Gurus 

East Meets West (Philip Harper) 

A re-arrangement of the band on stage – this time the deep thinkers that appear on the cover the Indian gurus are paid tribute in this original composition. The band’s percussionists perform table a and the kaleidoscopic backdrop on screen is mirrored beautifully by the opening sounds. The tabla being played at the front of the band adds an exotic touch as gradually the piece builds to its conclusion. The fab four and their coloured jackets make a return and  we are treated to a final airing of With A Little help.

Their fnal freeze frame pose is again a mirror image of the album cover – clever, at times funny, with moments of pathos and a big finale. Can’t ask for more than that – this is a winner!

6. Eikanger-Bjørsvik Musikklag (Reid Gilje) 

Tales of the North Sea 

No staged entry or lining up across the front for the Norwegians – just get on stage and play the four parts of the Tale of the North Sea.

Waves on Deck (Kjetil Djønne)

The opening sound is huge – and leads to the rhythmic tale of a large vessel caught in a storm on the North Sea. Cargo rolls across the deck, wind howling and waves threaten to engulf it. Wow – the playing is exceptional, wonderful solo contribution form the band’s principal euphonium and the deep, dark sounds from the lower end rumble throughout the hall.

The Boatmen’s Ballad (Frode Rydland - flugel soloist: Gyda Matland)

With a sound like liquid gold, flugel soloist Gyda Matland’s plaintive intoning of this lovely ballad raises goosebumps - beautiful.

The Mackerel Shoal and the Lonely Monkfish (Reid Gilje)

The opening marimba solo is so atmospheric and aptly depicts a fast-moving shoal of mackerel. Some stunning soprano playing and a simply wonderful trombone section (playing the part of the lonely monkfish) add to this fascinating work. The lament of the lonely monkfish is soulfully rendered, accompanied by bubble blowing – yes it really works! The marimba mackerel are back (did I mention the classy triangle playing?)

Dark Abyss (Fredrick Schjelderup)

For the least explored part of the planet comes a new work by young Danish composer Frederick Schjelderup. Dark Abyss is suitably serious – a fitting finale to this North Sea-themed programme. (The stereo cymbal effects are particularly notable).

Not the staged and choreographed programming of other bands, but when is band playing of the highest quality, stunning soloists and great original brass band writing not entertaining?  Sometimes it’s just a privilege to hear a great band playing at their best.

5. Fountain City (Dr. Joseph Parisi)

 

‘Icons of the Age’

Creep (Hammond, Hazlewood, Yorke, Greenwood, Greenwood, O’Brien and Selway arr. Lee Harrelson) 

Radiohead tribute opens with the band arranged over the whole stage, facing different directions. The flugel walks on from the middle of the hall – love this already. Cornets on chairs now – what a start! (Percussion a little too pushy? this leads directly on to…

Enterprising Young Men from Star Trek (Michael Giacchino arr. Harrelson) 

The choreography is changing – but so slick!  Some intonation issues at the Star Trek theme itself

We Seven (Derek Jenkins) 

Project Mercury  aimed to put the first Americans into space involving seven astronauts and their book is the inspiration for this especially dedicated original piece. It opens with narration by Frank while the stage is still in darkness – probably the most effective way to interact band and screen images! Really imaginative use of lighting to depict John Glenn’s first view of the earth from space. The audience are starlit, with images of the earth on screen- great. A fitting tribute to the late John Glen.

Danza Final from Estancia (Alberto Ginastera arr. Harrelson) 

Another icon – Gustavo Dudamel - provides the inspiration for the band’s next piece. A fiery and energetic malambo complete with competing cowboys in the form of the band’s principal euphonium, Lee Harrelson! (Who also arranged the music).

Who Wants to Live Forever? (Brian May arr. Peter Meechan - featuring Matthew Vangjel (flugel) and Ryan Sharp (trumpet)

A tribute to the late, great Freddie Mercury that was written by Brian May for the film The Highlander. This languid change of pace opens so stylishly with the band’s flugel soloist Matthew Vangiel. When the music really opens up the drumkit shines and leads to solo trumpet Ryan Sharp. Clever staging with flugel on one side and trumpet on the other -  I think there is definitely room for a screaming trumpet here!

It leads straight to the ultra-high energy Brass Machine.

Brass Machine (Mark Taylor arr. Harrelson) 

Joe Parisi has joined his trumpet section with a stunning solo in this high-octane finale. The band is really enjoying this – and so are we!

Great fun – great attention to detail and some stunning soloists. Loved this contribution by the Americans, they are just fantastic.

4. Virtuosi GUS (Adam Cooke)

‘A Musical Journey to the Far East’

Cherry Blossoms and Yagi Bushi from Japanese Tune (Soichi Konagaya arr. Christian Overhead) 

The band enter to an atmospheric percussion accompaniment – and the trend for placing everyone across the front on the stage continues, with added fast-moving choreography and vocals. An effective opener! If you’re going to go for a theme – go all out! Bamboo lighting and Japanese flags emblazon the walls of the Sage now.

Bushido (Christian Overhead - euphonium soloist: Matthew White) 

The unwritten Samurai code of conduct, known as Bushido, held that the true warrior must hold that loyalty, courage, veracity, compassion, and honour as important, above all else. An appreciation and respect of life was also imperative, as it added balance to the warrior character of the Samurai. All of this in the form of a euphonium solo written by Christian Overhead. Soloist Matthew White sails through the technical pyrotechnics with ease.

Song for Japan (Steve Verhelst arr. Gustav Aaberg)

Another new commission, this time an arrangement of Steve Verheist’s tribute to the victims of the 2011 earthquake. Featuring quintet and band, this had some lovely delicate moments. (Although the quintet were slightly awkwardly placed off to the side).

The Burning of Mount Wakakusa (Eric Guinivan) 

This representation of the Japanese ‘burning festival’ of Mount Wakakusa has flames on screen and dramatic lighting to lend atmosphere – the playing is pretty hot stuff as well!

Tale of the Dragon (Paul Lovatt-Cooper) 

This Japanese folk tale tells the story of a Dragon living in a mountain that terrorises the local village - very Tolkein! With music that has interlocking soloists, fiery percussion, a lyrical love theme and an ending in typical PLC fashion, this reptilian fire-breather provides a fitting climactic close to Virtuosi’s performance.

This was terrific programming that ticked all of the BiC boxes, and was fairly well received by the audience. Enjoyable, with just enough contrast and well delivered under Adam Cooke’s accomplished hand.

3. Carlton Main Frickley Colliery (Ian McElligott) 

'Back In Time'

Back to the Future (Alan Silvestri) 

Big screen opening – leads to Alan Silvestri’s iconic theme music. The band are classic formation and the lighting/ screen and smoke effects provide a safe, if uninspiring, opening.

Song from Milestone (Peter Meechan - cornet soloist: Kirsty Abbotts) 

We travel back 100 years in this tribute to those who were lost in the Battle of Passchendaele. Pete Meechan’s lovely lament, in the form of a cornet solo for Kirsty Abbotts, is sobering and accompanied by images on screen. Kirsty’s soulful playing is so apt and well received by the audience.

Havana Heat (Ben Hollings) 

A new commission by the band’s composer-in-residence sets the scene in Havana, 1942. Trumpets, and a well-executed comedy element make for a crowd-pleasing number. The band have really warmed their programme up now and with great solo contributions (particularly from solo trombone) this has the audience going! Biggest round of applause is saved for the comedy grunt!

Alfie (Ian McElligott - flugel soloist: Sam Fisher) 

The band’s ‘time theme’ links Alf Ramsey with the character played by Michael Caine in this flugel solo arranged by the band’s conductor. A languid and stylish account by soloist Sam Fisher – perhaps at times a little too strident, nice control to end though.

Finale from From Ancient Times (Jan Van der Roost)

Carlton Main close with music written by one of today’s adjudicators that tracks the history of the band’s 133 years.

This was a programme of ups and downs, the ‘time theme’ was a nice idea, however we could have done without the electronic counter between each item. Not without its flaws, this was nonetheless another well-received performance. The audience are being treated today!

Virtuosi GUS and conductor Adam Cooke are next.

 

2. Paris Brass Band (Florent Didier)

'Life’ 

With a programme especially commissioned for Brass in Concert, newcomers Paris chose to depict the seven stages of Life. This is a written-through programme by the band’s composer-in-residence Fabien Cali.

I. Birth (Fabien Cali - cornet soloist: Alexis Demailly) 

II. Rushing Through! (Fabien Cali) 

III. Hymne à l’amour - Paroles de Edith Piaf (Marguerite Monnot arr. Jean-Jacques Charles, rev. Fabien Cali - flugel soloist: Jean-Philippe Benesse) 

IV. Death (Fabien Cali) 

V. Afterglow (Fabien Cali) 

VI. Grieving (Fabien Cali - euphonium soloist: Bastien Baumet) 

VII. A New Dawn (Fabien Cali - Eb tuba soloist: Jean-Baptiste Renaux) 

VIII. Rejoicing (Fabien Cali)

The opening is narrated by compere Frank Renton, ad it provides an atmospheric ‘airy’ opening – so inventive.  The beautifully crafted sounds of the beginnings of ‘Life’ soon give way to the driving rhythms of part 2 – Rushing.  They are so comfortable telling a story in this way. Fabien Cali is definitely a voice worth listening to – and with musicality of this band and their conductor, it could be a winning combination.

Part 3 is an homage to Ravel  in their Bolero-styled flugel solo. A blackout with immensely clever lighting effects (with lighters) in Afterglow - love this.  It gives way to a plaintive quintet to the side of the stage depicting Grieving. The euphonium solioist Bastien Beaumet portrays this magnificently. Breathing, snoring, multi-phonic effects from Eb tuba soloist Jean-Baptiste Renaux herald A New Dawn. Fantastic!

Closing their programme is the aptly named Rejoicing with thrilling sounds all round. This takes brass band programming to a new level. Is it different? Most certainly! So clever and so enjoyable.

 

 

1. Flowers (David Childs) – ‘Icons of Their Time’

 

Blackbird Special (Dirty Dozen Brass Band arr. Reid Gilje) 

Flowers have taken ‘musical icons’ as inspiration for their programme today, opening with an effectively choreographed and polished performance of Blackbird Special.

La Fiesta Chick Corea (arr. Philip Harper)

We have Latin fire and jazz fusion from band and soloists alike in Chick Corea’s La Fiesta. David Childs takes every opportunity to feature a sparkling cornet section in particular.

La Napolitaine (Oskar Böhme - arr. Ralph Pearce - cornet soloist: Harmen Vanhoorn) 

Harmen Vanhoorn is the featured soloist for Flowers in this premier performance and what a delight this is. La Napolitaine has the frenzy of a tarantella combined with a delicate middle section that winds up to a spectacular close.

Nobody Does it Better (Marvin Hamlisch arr. Paul Lovatt-Cooper - featuring Emily Evans (tenor horn) and Joanne Childs (flugel horn)

A change of pace In this tribute to Sir Roger Moore and a new arrangement featuring Joanne Childs and Emily Evans. An opening duet that gives way to a quintet of three flugel horns, tenor horn and euphonium provides a crowd-pleasing number.

Legends (Peter Graham), Toss the Feathers (trad. Arr. Peter Graham)

Flowers’ finale takes inspiration from American brass icons and peter Graham’s Legends allows the ban’ds fine soloists to shine.

A nice touch – an encore (almost without Harmen Vanhoorn!) to close – well thought through David. A virtuosic encore with the whole band across the stage to close and very well received by the audience.

An enjoyable and well-crafted opening performance from Flowers – fantastic start!

 

 

 

 

 

Draw

1. Flowers (David Childs)

Blackbird Special (Dirty Dozen Brass Band arr. Reid Gilje) 

La Fiesta Chick Corea (arr. Philip Harper) 

La Napolitaine (Oskar Böhme - arr. Ralph Pearce - cornet soloist: Harmen Vanhoorn) 

Nobody Does it Better (Marvin Hamlisch arr. Paul Lovatt-Cooper - featuring Emily Evans (tenor horn) and Joanne Childs (flugel horn)) 

Legends (Peter Graham), Toss the Feathers (trad. Arr. Peter Graham)

 

2. Paris Brass Band (Florent Didier)

‘Life’ 

I. Birth (Fabien Cali - cornet soloist: Alexis Demailly) 

II. Rushing Through! (Fabien Cali) 

III. Hymne à l’amour - Paroles de Edith Piaf (Marguerite Monnot arr. Jean-Jacques Charles, rev. Fabien Cali - flugel soloist: Jean-Philippe Benesse) 

IV. Death (Fabien Cali) 

V. Afterglow (Fabien Cali) 

VI. Grieving (Fabien Cali - euphonium soloist: Bastien Baumet) 

VII. A New Dawn (Fabien Cali - Eb tuba soloist: Jean-Baptiste Renaux) 

VIII. Rejoicing (Fabien Cali)

 

3. Carlton Main Frickley Colliery (Ian McElligott) 

Back to the Future (Alan Silvestri) 

Song from Milestone (Peter Meechan - cornet soloist: Kirsty Abbotts) 

Havana Heat (Ben Hollings) 

Alfie (Ian McElligott - flugel soloist: Sam Fisher) 

Finale from From Ancient Times (Jan Van der Roost)

 

4. Virtuosi GUS (Adam Cooke)

Cherry Blossoms and Yagi Bushi from Japanese Tune (Soichi Konagaya arr. Christian Overhead) 

Bushido (Christian Overhead - euphonium soloist: Matthew White) 

Song for Japan (Steve Verhelst arr. Gustav Aaberg), 

The Burning of Mount Wakakusa (Eric Guinivan) 

Tale of the Dragon (Paul Lovatt-Cooper) 

 

5. Fountain City (Dr. Joseph Parisi)

Creep (Hammond, Hazlewood, Yorke, Greenwood, Greenwood, O’Brien and Selway arr. Lee Harrelson) 

Enterprising Young Men from Star Trek (Michael Giacchino arr. Harrelson) 

We Seven (Derek Jenkins) 

Danza Final from Estancia (Alberto Ginastera arr. Harrelson) 

Who Wants to Live Forever? (Brian May arr. Peter Meechan - featuring Matthew Vangjel (flugel) and Ryan Sharp (trumpet)) 

Brass Machine (Mark Taylor arr. Harrelson) 

 

6. Eikanger-Bjørsvik Musikklag (Reid Gilje) 

Tales of the North Sea 

Waves on Deck (Kjetil Djønne), 

The Boatmen’s Ballad (Frode Rydland - flugel soloist: Gyda Matland), 

The Mackerel Shoal and the Lonely Monkfish (Reid Gilje), 

Dark Abyss (Fredrick Schjelderup). 

 

7. Cory (Philip Harper)

Sergeant Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band - The World’s Most Iconic Album Sleeve EVER! 

It was 50 years ago today… 

Sergeant Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band (Paul McCartney arr. Philip Harper), I’ll Get By With a Little Help From My Friends (McCartney arr. Harper - featuring Tom Hutchinson and Stephanie Wilkins (cornets), Chris Thomas and Gareth Robinson (trombones)) 

The Great Entertainers 

Captain from Castile (Alfred Newman arr. Philip Harper) 

The Visionary Artists 

Mood Indigo (Duke Ellington, arr. Philip Harper) 

The Noble Poets 

And Death Shall Have No Dominion (Philip Harper - euphonium soloist: Glyn Williams) 

The Gurus 

East Meets West (Philip Harper) 

 

8. Brighouse and Rastrick Dr. (David Thornton)

‘…point me to the skies’ - a celebration of the human spirit 

Declaration (Drew Fennell) 

‘…all men are created equal, they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable rights, that among these are life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness.’ - The Declaration of Independence (1776) 

Ave Maria (J.S. Bach/Gounod arr. Andrew Baker - horn soloist: Sheona White) 

’The final aim of all music should be none other than the glory of God and the refreshment of the soul.’ - J.S. Bach (1716) 

Metal (Graham Fitkin arr. Andrew Baker) 

“Doctors and scientists said that breaking the four-minute mile was impossible, that one would die in the attempt. Thus, when I got up after collapsing at the finish line, I figured I was dead.” - Roger Bannister (1954) 

Reaching for the Stars (Michael Kamen arr. Andrew Baker) 

‘Here men from the Planet Earth first set foot upon the moon, July 1969 A.D. We came in peace for all mankind.’ - The inscription on a plaque left behind after Apollo 11 departed. 

Finale from Vita Destructa (Todd Smith) 

“For time and the world do not stand still. Change is the law of life. And those who look only to the past or present are certain to miss the future.” John F. Kennedy (1963)

 

9. Grimethorpe Colliery (Capt. Sam Hairsine) 

Lawrence of Arabia (Maurice Jarre arr. Mortimer) 

Toccata from Le Tombeau de Couperin (Ravel arr. Tony Rickard) 

Little Fugue in G Minor (J.S. Bach arr. Sandy Smith) 

In Christ Alone (Getty and Townsend arr. R. Philips) 

Prelude to Lavenham (Geoffrey Nobes) 

Celestial Celebration - Finale from Earthrise (Nigel Clarke)

 

10. Leyland (Thomas Wyss)

What Now My Love (Stanley Black arr. John Doyle) 

Malaguena (Stanley Black arr. Thomas Wyss) 

People (Jule Stryne arr. Stanley Black trans. Alan Catherall - trumpet soloist: John Doyle) 

Meadowland (Stanley Black arr. John Doyle). 

 

11. Foden’s Dr. (Robert Childs)

Youngblood (Daniel Hall) 

Elfried (George Swift arr. Alan Catherall - euphonium soloist: Gary Curtin) 

12th Street Rag (Eubay Bowman arr. Daniel Hall) 

Memories of a Lost Child (Ben Hollings) 

Diversions after Purcell (Purcell arr. Jonathan Bates) 

Fugue from Young Persons Guide to the Orchestra (Benjamin Britten arr. David Childs).

 

12. Tredegar (Ian Porthouse)

Breaking Boundaries: A celebration of the spirit of adventure 

A nation responds... Calling All Workers (Eric Coates arr. Ceri John) 

Seeking freedom through music... A Mis Abuelos (Arturo Sandoval arr. Jacob Vilhelm Larsen - trumpet soloist: 

Dewi Griffiths) 

Fighting for a cause... Ivory Ghosts (Gavin Higgins) 

Reinventing tradition... Fuga y Misterio (Astor Piazzolla arr. Leigh Baker) 

The forgotten innovator... Gypsy Dance (Alexander Dargomyzhsky arr. Ceri John) 

Celebrating acceptance and inclusion... Rainbow Connections (Daniel Hall)